Advertisements

We're a little crazy, about science!

Stem cells derived from amniotic tissues have immunosuppressive properties

pregnant women

Stem cells derived from human amnion have for some time been considered promising for cell therapies because of their ease of access, ability to differentiate, and absence of ethical issues. Now, a research team has found that stem cells derived from human female amnion also have immunosuppressive activity and that the addition of antibodies to specific factors can enhance their immunosuppressive potential.

The amniotic membrane is a tissue of fetal origin comprised of three layers. It is thought that there is a special immunologic mechanism protecting the fetus, so researchers were interested in finding out what immunological properties might reside in – and be extractable from – amnion cells.

“The human amniotic membrane contains both epithelial cells and mesenchymal cells,” said study co-author Dr. Toshio Nikaido, Department of Regenerative Medicine.

“Both kinds of cells have proliferation and differentiation characteristics, making the amniotic membrane a promising and attractive source for amnion-derived cells for transplantation in regenerative medicine. It is clear that these cells have promise, although the mechanism of their immune modulation remains to be elucidated.”

In this study, amnion-derived cells exerted an inhibitory effect on natural killer cells (NK cells) and induced white blood cell activation. The researchers reported that the amnion-derived cells saw increases in interleukin-10 (IL-10).

“We consider that IL-10 was involved in the function of amnion-derived cells toward NK cells,” explained Dr. Nikaido. “The immunomodulation of amnion-derived cells is a complicated procedure involving many factors, among which IL-10 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) play important roles.”

Naturally occurring prostaglandins, such as PGE2, have important effects in labor and also stimulate osteoblasts to release factors that stimulate bone resorption by osteoclasts. PGE2 also suppresses T cell receptor signaling and may play a role in resolution of inflammation.

The use of antibodies against PGE2 and IL-10 removed the immunosuppressive effects of the amnion-derived cells by increasing natural killer cell cytotoxicity. This implies that these two factors are contributing elements to the immunosuppressive abilities of amnion-derived cells.

“Soluble factors IL-10 and PGE2 produced by amnion-derived cells may suppress allogenic, or “other” related immune responses,” concluded Dr. Nikaido.

“Our findings support the hypothesis that these cells have potential therapeutic use. However, further study is needed to identify the detailed mechanisms responsible for their immodulatory effects. Amnion-derived cells must be transplanted into mouse models for further in vivo analysis of their immunosuppressive activity or anti-inflammatory effects.”

If this research applies to humans, this could end the need for immunosuppressive drugs in transplant cases. It might even provide ways to treat autoimmune diseases, but it will be a long time before any of that happens and I’m just getting ahead of myself taking guesses like this.

Sources:
Li J, Koike-Soko C, Sugimoto J, Yoshida T, Okabe M, & Nikaido T (2014). Human Amnion-derived Stem Cells have Immunosuppressive Properties on NK cells and Monocytes. Cell transplantation PMID: 25333453

Advertisements

But enough about us, what about you?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s