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Posts tagged “epidemiology

Google searches for ‘chickenpox’ reveal big impact of vaccinations

digital epidemiology

digital epidemiology

Countries that implement government-mandated vaccinations for chickenpox see a sharp drop in the number of Google searches for the common childhood disease afterward, demonstrating that immunization significantly reduces seasonal outbreaks.¬†That’s one of the findings from a new study that analyzed thousands of Google searches for “chickenpox.”

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Television viewing linked to higher injury risk in hostile people

Television viewing linked to higher injury risk in hostile people

People with hostile personality traits who watch more television than their peers may be at a greater risk for injury, potentially because they are more susceptible to the influence of television on violence and risk-taking behaviors, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health analysis discovered.

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Largest-ever study of parental age and autism finds increased risk with teen moms

autism can be scary

The largest-ever multinational study of parental age and autism risk, funded by Autism Speaks, found increased autism rates among the children of teen moms and among children whose parents have relatively large gaps between their ages. The study also confirmed that older parents are at higher risk of having children with autism. The analysis included more than 5.7 million children in five countries.

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Google searches for ‘n-word’ associated with black mortality

Black lives matter

Google searches could unveil patterns in Black mortality rates across the US, according to a new study. Researchers found that those areas with greater levels of racism, as indexed by the proportion of Google searches containing the “n-word,” had higher mortality rates among Blacks. The study is the first to examine an Internet query-based measure of racism in relation to mortality risk.

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Do you have the genes of a rapist?

StopRape

Rape, it’s so taboo that victims are sometimes shamed for “letting” it¬†happening. It’s a dirty word, no one likes the word rape so we come up with other names for it — sexual assault for example. Well new research shows that close relatives of men convicted of sexual offences commit similar offences themselves more frequently than comparison subjects. The study suggests that this is due to genetic factors rather than shared family environment. The study includes all men convicted of sex crime in Sweden during 37 years.

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